A fairway view, if you can duck every so often

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I am always amazed by stories like this. If you buy a house on a fault line, be prepared for eathquake damage. The same is true for golf courses – if you buy a house on a golf course, be prepared for balls to drop into your yard, through your windows or even into your oven (now that was wierd).

I actually don’t like playing on courses with houses. It’s not that I end up in their yard (I am not a longer hitter and usually hit the short grass), but I hate playing with stereos blasting, kids screaming in swimming pools and back yard partying going on while I’m trying to putt.

Anyway…I still wonder why anyone would risk their house and even the lives by living on a golf course. I guess they have no FORE-sight – ha ha…

Golfgal


A fairway view, if you can duck every so often
BY BILL PENNINGTON
National Post
25 Jun 2007

When she moved into her retirement condominium on a golf course, Eleanor Weiner admired the lush, pristine views of the fairways and greens, a landscape she never had to mow or maintain. Not long after, as she prepared dinner, a golf ball shattered the… read more…

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3 comments

  1. Here we go…another issue I am involved with…you have got to quit teeing these up for me to hit…
    I do live on a golf course and right at the end of a dogleg left that when the course was built 50 years ago, even Jack Nicholas could not hit a shot to hit my yard much less my house. Now golfers swinging drivers that look like a Mini Cooper on a stick, I am getting balls in my front yard which according to my SkyCaddie is over 365 yards from the back tees.
    I find these articles amusing on the most part since the legal advice being provided does not clearly stated that all of the case brought into court will be judged individually. There are very few states that have put laws on their books that outline who is liable in this situation because of that one fact, every situation is different.
    I can agree that a property owner who lives on the edge of a golf course does hold certain understandings that it is inevitable a golf ball is going to hit their property. And again, if they placed their home as close as they could to the properties lines then, yes, the understanding of the risk to homeowner’s property being damaged becomes amplified.
    In the case mentioned in the article the NY Times posted (link provided)

    http://tinyurl.com/yp2elb

    the homes were not in any danger when the course was built. Now with technology bring out golf equipment that sends the ball further than golf courses are designed for that length the situations for those property owners liabilities has changed. The golf course owners are also a part of being responsible with advising golfers of their risks and liabilities. Their failure to do so places the golf course owners as party to share in the liabilities a golfer could cause to property along the golf course being damaged.
    The bottom-line on this issue becomes: If there is notice placed on a teebox providing the players universal information on the risk factors that are involved with the shots they are going to attempt to make to play the hole, like the exact yardage to a turning point in the fairway or to out of bounds, then the golfers have been advised of those risk factors involved in playing that hole. Whether the golfer choices to heed to the notice and responsibly play the hole as it are designed to be played they are taking a less riskier position when they take to the tee. On the other hand, if the golfer is going to take the ultimate risk and play to a yardage he knows puts the possibility of property damage being caused from an errant shot then they are placing themselves into taking total responsibility of the damage they cause to the property. If that takes place this is where the judge will weigh in the cases that make it in where the golfer has just as much responsibility to play golf responsibly as the property has the right of enjoying the view and the game of golf. The question becomes enforcement which brings the golf course owners back into the circle of responsibility. Property owners have rights as much as the golfers. As long as it stays that way, I am sure the zillions of dollars people are paying to live on golf courses will continue causing the golf course owners to be happy to pay for signage all around the course reminding golfers of their responsibilities as responsible golfers.
    Of course, if someone placed their brand new Cadillac right up next to the green and it gets hit, I could see the judge seeing some intent of the car owner to have the lack of responsibility…so there are two sides to this issue which keeps the courts busy …but…As long s the rights remain equal then I am sure golf property owners like me will be happy with enjoying all of the Pro-V1’s golfers want to lob over into our yard they want… Personally, I feel the risk of damaging someone’s property along the golf course would be reduced if some people would just take a few lessons..

  2. Happy to keep teeing it up if I get responses like this one. 🙂

    My car was recently dented by an errant pitch from a golfer who was practicing at a range near my work. I know that I would have left a note if I hit someone’s car (that golfer didn’t) and I certainly would fess up to hitting a house on a course if I did that. We are supposed to be “gentlepeople” right? It’s what makes golf more civilized than other sports.

    Keep em coming, Duke!

  3. Bravo, Duke!

    Well stated.

    It’s called the “Gentleman’s Game” (nothing against the ladies, by any means).

    Be a gentleman. You break it you buy it! Most homes adjacent to a course are only hit when a shot is outside of that bell curve of standard deviation.

    If you know that you’re better at the Mini Putt–donning your one club with an blue or green ball aiming at the perpetually moving windmill–then maybe you shouldn’t be taking shots at 1/2 million dollar homes just yet.

    If you go to a gun range and accidentally shoot someone due to your lack of experience, is it his fault since he was at the gun range?

    If there are houses on the left and you’re a hooker (not by profession), maybe, just maybe you should aim a bit to the right…or just keep that check book handy.

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